First Time Watches - July 2012

The Professionals (1966)
Richard Brooks' western has more in common with a modern piece of revisionism than the genre films of it's time.
Unfortunately it lacks the existential depth of Peckinpah but also the humor and characters of Hawks. It's still an enjoyable if forgettable flick and is most notable for Conrad Hall's stunning cinematography. Practically everyone involved in this would go on to better things in the genre or had already passed their prime. 7/10


Why Stop Now? (2012)
Yet another Indie "dramedy" in the vein of Wes Anderson and the Duplass Brothers. In order to check her into rehab, Jesse Eisenberg must get his mother, Melissa Leo, high so her urine sample is approved. They call into her dealer, 30 Rock's Tracy Morgan, but he's fresh out. The three set off on an adventure of (yawn) self discovery. It's not particularly dramatic and there's not much in the way of comedy despite the best efforts of the talented lead trio. 5/10




Little Murders (1971)
Such was the depth of quality in seventies cinema that many movies of the era have been unfairly forgotten. While stars like De Niro, Pacino and Hoffmann are still lauded it's easy to forget how great Elliot Gould, Alan Arkin and Donald Sutherland were. All three feature in Arkin's directorial debut, a surreal black comedy which originally had Godard attached. Gould is great as a photographer who has lost the ability to feel and wanders through life with detachment. Marcia Rodd is the young woman obsessed with waking him from his emotional coma. Watch for Sutherland's hilarious cameo as the preacher of the "First Existential" church. 8/10