The Movie Waffler ANNETTE Heads MUBI UK’s November Line-up | The Movie Waffler

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ANNETTE Heads MUBI UK’s November Line-up

annette
The arthouse streaming service has announced its November schedule.

MUBI UK's November line-up is headlined by the addition of Leos Carax's musical, the latest from American indie filmmaker Alexandre Rockwell, the beginning of a retrospective of the early work of Denis Villeneuve and more.


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Annette
Visionary filmmaker Leos Carax makes a triumphant return with Annette (2021), which sees him teaming up with Sparks, one of pop’s best-loved and most influential cult bands, to tell an audacious story of the pitfalls of love, fame and fortune in a musical extravaganza starring Adam Driver and Marion Cotillard.
 
Following the film’s spectacular reception at the 2021 Cannes Film Festival, where it premiered as the Opening Film and won the coveted Best Director Award, the unabashedly unique and unforgettable spectacle, soundtracked by Sparks’ typically idiosyncratic music and lyrics, will be coming to MUBI this November, crowning their Leos Carax season 'Love and Other Drugs: The Cinema of Leos Carax', which continues this month with his early work Mauvais Sang (1986). The other titles in the season, now available to stream are Holy Motors (2012), and Boy Meets Girl (1984).


Cosmic Trajectory: The Early Films of Denis Villeneuve

Cosmic Trajectory: The Early Films of Denis Villeneuve
With his latest film Dune hitting cinemas this month, MUBI exclusively presents a survey of Denis Villeneuve’s early work by showing his second feature Maelström (2000). Narrated by a talking fish, this is a playful, often laugh-out-loud allegory, following a woman who starts dating the son of a man she killed in a car accident. Also included in the focus are Cosmos (1996) and August 32nd on Earth (1998).


Landscape Plus: The Films of Laida Lertxundi

Landscape Plus: The Films of Laida Lertxundi
The Basque Country-born, California-educated Laida Lertxundi is one of the most notable and revered experimental filmmakers of the last decade. A rare occasion to see her work digitally, Autoficción (2020) and 025 Sunset Red (2016) are two essential, sun-baked shorts in an oeuvre that continues to be playful and expand the boundaries of cinema. The series also includes Words, Planets (2018), Cry When it Happens (2010), and Footnotes to a House of Love (2007).


Bad Habits: A Double Bill

Bad Habits: A Double Bill
To celebrate the UK premiere of Paul Verhoeven’s audacious new epic Benedetta (2021) at the BFI London Film Festival this October, MUBI presents a special double bill: two adaptations of Diderot’s famous novel The Nun playing across October and November: now showing Guillaume Nicloux’s version (2013), to be followed by Jacques Rivette’s (1966) on 2 November.


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Sweet Thing
This month, MUBI exclusively presents Alexandre Rockwell's bright and hopeful Sweet Thing (2020), which centres around the lives of two children in contemporary New Bedford, Massachusetts, during one eventful summer. Semi-improvised, shot in luminous black and white, and receiving the esteemed endorsement of Quentin Tarantino, the film captures the nuances of adolescence like few others.




Moments Like This Never Last

Moments Like This Never Last
In November, MUBI continues their Portrait of the Artist series, inviting audiences to take a peek into the mind of prolific New York artist Dash Snow in MUBI’s exclusive presentation of Moments Like This Never Last (2020). Thrust into the international art world as a graffiti artist and photographer, Dash Snow’s tragically short life is recounted through friends and peers in this evocative and moving documentary. A contemporary with such figures as Ryan McGinley and Dan Dolen, Snow's work lives on in the countless artists he inspired, and the shape-shifting way he adapted into a rapidly branded art world.


80,000 Years Old

80,000 Years Old
Enthusiastically returning to her hometown of Normandy for work, an archaeologist reunites with old acquaintances, though her joy begins to dwindle after the trip doesn't go according to plan. Employing inventive split screen to reflect the character's self-reflection, doubt, and memories of her childhood, director Christelle Lheureux's 80,000 Years Old (2020) inventively weaves the past and present and the real and unreal.



Friends and Strangers
James Vaughan’s astonishing debut Friends and Strangers (2021) follows Australian twenty-somethings Ray and Alice, who lack very little in life—and maybe that’s their biggest problem. As they navigate a series of increasingly awkward and comedic situations, whether in terms of friendship or love, leisure time or work, nowhere does there seem to be much at stake in their lives.



Maeve
Maeve (1981), set during the Troubles, is Pat Murphy’s first and most audacious film, which follows the titular Maeve who returns to Belfast after a long absence in London. The film captures conversations between Maeve and various characters across time, representing varying and opposing political viewpoints, during the Northern Irish conflict. Newly restored.



The Trouble with Being Born
In The Trouble with Being Born (2020) Elli is an android child and lives with an older man she calls her father. She shares his memories, from important moments to incidental ones, and anything else he programs her to remember. A 21st century semi-adaptation of Pinocchio, uncovering new boundaries regarding our fraught relationships with the machines we use and the people we love.



Accidental Luxuriance of the Translucent Watery Rebus
In this wildly ambitious Croatian animated film by Dalibor Barić, Accidental Luxuriance of the Translucent Watery Rebus (2020), Martin, who attempted to fight the system and is escaping authorities, partners with Sara, a conceptual artist. Together they join a revolutionary commune in the countryside, with the police on their trail. A truly visionary film of grand imaginative ambition, reminiscent of (and referencing) movies by Godard, Tarkovsky, and Cronenberg, and books by Philip K. Dick, Robbe-Grillet, and Ursula K. Le Guin.