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10 Movies You Must See In October

joker
Our guide to the most interesting movies coming to UK/ROI cinemas in October.


As an underwhelming summer blockbuster season fades into memory, we're into the business end of the movie year. Here are our 10 picks of the new releases coming to UK/ROI cinemas this October.


Joker
joker
It's rare for us to recommend a comic book movie but it's impossible to ignore the buzz around Joker, particularly given its top prize win at the Venice Film Festival. Joaquin Phoenix is the latest actor to don the runny makeup, with director Todd Phillips (who as the director of the infamous documentary Hated: GG Allin & the Murder Junkies, knows a thing or two about performative psychopaths) channelling the look of '70s New York for his gritty vision of Gotham.

In cinemas October 4th.




Judy
judy
Speaking of runny makeup, Judy sees RenΓ©e Zellweger bid for Oscar glory with her portrayal of troubled screen icon Judy Garland. Like Stan & Ollie, Judy follows the Hollywood star as she attempts to resuscitate her career with a series of shows in England. Look out for rising star Jessie Buckley, who can belt out a tune herself, in this one too.

In cinemas October 4th.




Tehran: City of Love
Tehran: City of Love
Director Ali Jaberansari delivers the stories of three lovelorn residents of the bustling Iranian capital, including a closeted gay bodybuilder, an overweight receptionist and a religious singer. Jaberansari's film has been commended for its melding of pitch black humour with genuine affection for its characters.

In cinemas October 11th.





The Day Shall Come
The Day Shall Come
As the man behind such satires as TV show Brass-Eye and Three Lions, Chris Morris is no stranger to tackling controversial themes and ruffling feathers. His US debut sees him explore the FBI's nasty habit of creating terrorists in order to further their own agenda, drawing on a crazy but true story involving Haitian immigrants manipulated by the Feds. Anna Kendrick adds star power to a cast of largely fresh faces.

In cinemas October 11th.




Non-Fiction
non-fiction
Director Olivier Assayas and star Juliette Binoche reteam for Non-Fiction, following their recent acclaimed collaboration on Clouds of Sils Maria. Assayas's latest, which has taken a while to reach these shores, is a comic drama set in the Parisian publishing world. Guillaume Canet and Vincent Macaigne also star.

In cinemas October 18th.




The Peanut Butter Falcon
The Peanut Butter Falcon
Shia LeBeouf is magnetic in this story of a young Down Syndrome man (a striking Zack Gottsagen) who flees his care home and embarks on a journey to a long defunct wrestling school. As with Green Book, this is another case of a minority character aiding a white man's redemption, but the performances are so good it's impossible not to be won over by its charms.

In cinemas October 18th.





A Good Woman Is Hard to Find
A Good Woman Is Hard to Find
Sarah Bolger is an actress who hasn't quite gotten the roles her talent deserves but her performance in this Northern Irish thriller should open doors for her. Bolger plays a young widower who finds herself drawn into a turf war between drug dealers in a deprived Belfast suburb, seeking revenge for her late husband's murder.

In cinemas October 25th.





By the Grace of God
By the Grace of God
Prolific French filmmaker François Ozon has tried his hand at almost every genre at this point. His latest sees him tackle the subject of Catholic abuse. Drawing on real life cases, the film is centred on four men who come together to confront the sexual abuse they suffered as children at the hands of their local priest.

In cinemas October 25th.




The Last Black Man in San Francisco
The Last Black Man in San Francisco
Director Joe Talbot's debut tackles issues like race and gentrification in a story of an African-American man (co-writer Jimmie Fails) who battles to reclaim a San Francisco house he believes was constructed by his grandfather. Fails draws on his personal experiences, lending the film a verisimilitude, and the filmmakers' affection for their city is apparent.

In cinemas October 25th.





Monos
monos
From Colombia comes this Lord of the Flies-esque drama. An American doctor (Julianne Nicholson) is taken hostage by a group of teenage guerillas and held on a Latin-American mountaintop. Director Alejandro Landes’ third feature has divided and confounded critics, who have described it as both fascinating and frustrating, singling out Mica Levi's score for praise.

In cinemas October 25th.




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