The Movie Waffler [Update] Billy Wilder's Comic Gem ONE, TWO, THREE Comes To UK Blu-Ray In April From Eureka [New Trailer] | The Movie Waffler

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[Update] Billy Wilder's Comic Gem ONE, TWO, THREE Comes To UK Blu-Ray In April From Eureka [New Trailer]

one, two, three billy wilder
Wilder's Cold War comedy gets a long-awaited UK blu-ray release.


one, two, three billy wilder blu-ray




Billy Wilder is best known for such comic masterpieces as Some Like It Hot and The Apartment, but just as good is his under-rated 1961 satire One, Two, Three. In the film, James Cagney delivers arguably a career best performance as a Berlin based Coke exec charged with keeping watch on his boss's teenage daughter while she visits Germany. With some of the most rapidly paced dialogue ever committed to film, One, Two, Three is a tour-de-force that harks back to the screwball comedies of the '30s.

Eureka Entertainment will release One, Two, Three on blu-ray April 15th as part of their Masters of Cinema series. You can order from Amazon here.

Special features include:

  • Limited Edition O Card slipcase [2000 copies ONLY]
  • 1080p presentation on Blu-ray
  • LPCM audio (original mono presentation)
  • Optional English SDH subtitles
  • Brand New and Exclusive Interview with film scholar Neil Sinyard
  • Feature Length Audio Commentary by Film Historian Michael Schlesinger
  • PLUS: A Collector’s booklet featuring new essays by film scholar Henry K. Miller, critic Adam Batty, and archival material



Eureka's synopsis reads:

Cagney is C.R. "Mac" MacNamara, a top Coca-Cola executive shipped off to (then West) Berlin and told to keep an eye on his boss' 17-year-old Atlanta socialite daughter Scarlett (Pamela Tiffin) while she visits Germany. Scarlett's tour seems endless, and Mac discovers she's fallen for a (then East) Berlin communist agitator and the young couple are bound for Moscow! Mac has to bust up the burgeoning romance before his boss learns the truth, all the while dealing with his wife Phyllis (Arlene Francis) and her own impatience with German living.


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